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Low-cost, Low-Altitude Drop Training

A C-130 low-cost, low altitude combat airdrop is accomplished by dropping bundles weighing 80 to 500 pounds, with pre-packed expendable parachutes, in groups of up to four per pass. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Nathan Byrnes)

Air Force Reserve pilots assigned to the 327th Airlift Squadron, Maj. Jason Furcron and Maj. Paul Campbell, prepare for take-off for a low-cost, low-altitude drop certification training flight March 3, 2019, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas. The LCLA capability enabled rapid and precise delivery of small tailored support packages to small units, with no operational pauses and with a much smaller logistics footprint. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Nathan Byrnes)

The low-altitude delivery is more accurate than traditional, higher-altitude airdrop methods and cuts down on stray bundles than can land away from the drop zone. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Nathan Byrnes)

A weighted training bundle is loaded at the tail of a C-130J to help aircrews practice low-cost, low altitude combat airdrop. A LCLA airdrop is accomplished by dropping bundles weighing 80 to 500 pounds, with pre-packed expendable parachutes, while a few hundred feet above ground. The low-altitude delivery is more accurate than traditional, higher-altitude airdrop methods and cuts down on stray bundles than can land away from the drop zone. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Nathan Byrnes)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. -- Air Force Reserve pilots assigned to the 327th Airlift Squadron, Maj. Jason Furcron and Maj. Paul Campbell, prepare for take-off for a low-cost, low-altitude drop certification training flight March 3, 2019, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas. The LCLA capability enabled rapid and precise delivery of small tailored support packages to small units, with no operational pauses and with a much smaller logistics footprint. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Nathan Byrnes)