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Become a Reserve MTI

Master Sgt. Robert Elliot, 433rd Training Squadron Military Training Instructors and recruiter, trains new Air Force recruits on the proper techniques for facing movements at Little Rock Air Force Base, AR, Dec. 1, 2018.

Master Sgt. Robert Elliot, 433rd Training Squadron Military Training Instructors and recruiter, trains new Air Force recruits on the proper techniques for facing movements at Little Rock Air Force Base, AR, Dec. 1, 2018. MTIs have a direct impact on the Air Force mission by shaping and training new Airmen. “We transform civilians into warrior Airmen,” said Elliot. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Chase Cannon)

Master Sgt. Robert Elliot, 433rd Training Squadron Military Training Instructors and recruiter, briefs special duty availabilities as Air Force Reserve MTIs to members of the 913th Airlift Group at Little Rock Air Force Base, AR, Dec. 1, 2018.

Master Sgt. Robert Elliot, 433rd Training Squadron Military Training Instructors and recruiter, briefs special duty availabilities as Air Force Reserve MTIs to members of the 913th Airlift Group at Little Rock Air Force Base, AR, Dec. 1, 2018. Becoming an MTI is a career path choice that can create life-long change in countless individuals, helps mold the future of the Air Force and create strong leaders. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Chase Cannon)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. --

All prior-service Air Force members have experienced the moment, quietly sitting on a bus at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, watching the dark blue hat ascend the steps bringing a wave of tension and excitement with it. That first interaction with an Air Force Military Training Instructor.

These men and women, who are responsible for molding the Air Force’s future, fill an integral role in the mission, which is open to anyone with the nerve to give it a try.

“This is a great opportunity for career development,” said Master Sgt. Robert Elliott, 433rd Training Squadron MTI and recruiter. “Have the courage to step out of your [Air Force Specialty Code] and go do a special duty assignment. They are all important but I would hold MTI against any other special duty for its importance and job satisfaction.”

Elliott, who has been a reserve MTI for approximately 3 years, offered 913th Airlift Group Airmen the opportunity to be considered for one of these special duty positions.

“The 433rd has opportunities for individual staff sgts. through master sgts. to come down and do a special duty assignment,” said Elliott. “I make sure that people are aware of these opportunities, which are going to help them out with their career progression, leadership skills and mentorship skills.”

It is obvious an MTI has a direct impact on their trainees, but don’t forget that the time spent as an MTI objectively has an impact on the Air Force. Chief Master Sgts. do not grow on trees, they are trained and lead by strong individuals giving them purpose and motivation.

“Our mission is to support basic military training and be an active partner with active duty,” said Elliott. “We transform civilians into warrior Airmen. Being able to see the transformation of our trainees from when they first get there to when they walk down the bomb run is probably the most enjoyable part of my job.”

Becoming an MTI is a career path choice that can create life-long change in countless individuals, offer responsibility to mold the future of the Air Force and create strong leaders. If you are interested in the possibility of filling this role, contact the 433rd Training Squadron recruiting team for more information.

433trs.recruiting@us.af.mil or dial DSN: 473-7579